BAYKO - How to Research Local Newspapers

PLEASE - DON'T PANIC!!!
There is nothing complicated about doing research like this at your local library, not least because every librarian I have come across so far has gone out of their way to be really helpful. Don't be afraid of looking a fool because you don't know what to do. They're used to it and are experts in helping you to help yourself.
Generally speaking, research into back copies of newspapers takes place in the reference library, so, if you live in a large town or city, this is likely to be located in the main central library, but it's worth a phone call to check before you set off! I've also heard of newspapers being held in the "Records Office" and the "Local Studies" sections of libraries and even in the local museum - again, just ask - before you set off!
 
How will you cary out your search?
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Bound Volumes of the actual newspapers.
 
Here, unless the library offers a copying service, you will need to use your camera, a digital one if you have one, and a tripod to take photos of the adverts. In this instance, you will certainly not be allowed to use pens or biros in the viewing area, so please remember to take a pencil. Local newspapers are usually printed on poor quality paper which deteriorates over time - please handle with care.
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Microfilm.
 
Here the newspapers have been photographed and a machine is provided for viewing the resultant film. Arrangements for making copies can vary. Some libraries have special machines which can take a copy for you there and then, others require you to fill out a form with the details necessary to identify exactly what you need copying, and where they are to send the copies. If the image quality is poor because the microfilm has become damaged by heavy use, please ask the library for contact details of the company or organisation holding the original copies of the film.
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Microfiche.
Here, again, the newspapers have been photographed and, in this case, a machine is provided for viewing the resultant slides. Again arrangements for making copies can vary. Some libraries have special machines which can take a copy for you there and then, others require you to fill out a form with the details necessary to identify exactly what you need copying, and where they are to send the copies.
 
Important Information and Advice.
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Please, please, please always remember to take a note of the year, month, day and page number of each advert plus something to ensure that you can identify the advert in case the copying firm don't label them. If making your own copies, please write the details on the back, in pencil.
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Please, please, please always include all of the small classified size adverts for local toy stores which sometimes appear underneath full BAYKO adverts, riding on BAYKO's coat-tails so-to-speak. These really add to the local flavour of the item.
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If you are making copies yourself direct from the machine, or when requesting copies from their copying service, please aim for a large image of the advert [and classifieds] rather than the full newspaper page whenever possible.
 
What are we looking for?
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Fully fledged BAYKO adverts, which are none too common!
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BAYKO sponsored adverts for local toyshops, which are also uncommon.
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Adverts for local toy shops which include BAYKO in the list of toys that they sell.
 
So far, all the BAYKO adverts I know of in local and regional newspapers appeared from mid November onwards - the run up to Christmas - and I only know of adverts between 1952 and 1961 - but, of course, there may be exceptions. In daily papers, there is usually one edition [Friday or possibly Thursday] which has the key concentration of adverts ready for the weekend's shopping. There have also been examples, in other media, of adverts in January, to catch those children lucky enough to be given money for Christmas!
 
I hope that helps - many thanks in advance for your efforts.
     
 
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